Vol. 13 - Issue 1 2017 - ISSN 1504-4831
Monday, 21 August 2017
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Volume 1 - issue 2 - 2005

Editorial Vol-1-Issue-2-2005

The second issue of Seminar.net containsimg_9809.jpg four articles and a book review – which all address the main interest of this journal. It has taken time to stabilize and make reliable the technology that drives this journal, because we do attempt to make images and texts co-operate to some extent. Our next step, technology-wise, is to make articles containing references to video hyperlinked. We hope that prospective authors will look forward to the option of using live images to support the conventional textual message. Our other feature – introducing each paper with a brief video – requires that authors that have papers accepted turn in a two-three minutes long video. Some readers have given us strong acclaim for this particular feature. We hope you find this useful for introducing the topic, to tempt you to read the full paper, and to read the paper with an image of the person who wrote it. We believe that giving a face to an otherwise quite anonymous academic, from a university or college somewhere in the world, is of additional value to the reader.

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Stealing Our Smarts: Indigenous knowledge in On-Line Learning

Alison Carr-Chellman offers in this article a critique of expertism and specialism in academe. Through an examination of indigenous knowledge as a phenomenon, also thought of as folk knowledge, this paper asserts that we need to move to more of a user-design approach to on-line learning design and development. Dr. Carr-Chellman is Professor in Charge of Instructional Systems at Penn State University.


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The Digital Culture and Communication: More than just Classroom Learning

Educators today are working hard to develop capacities to integrate technology and learning, which emphasize areas including technology, pedagogy, human communication, and teaching strategies. In this article, Kristen Snyder explores how such efforts are now opening doors beyond the classroom to create virtual communities for life long learning and professional development. Kristen Snyder is Ph.D. at the Department of Education Science at Mid Sweden University.


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